Ethics & Diversity

AFP fosters the development and growth of fundraising professionals and promotes high ethical standards in the fundraising profession.

Ethical standards and principles are the foundation for maintaining public trust, for every AFP member. AFP provides a self-governed process for addressing ethical concerns. Resources on ethical standards are available on the AFP International website:

 

Guidelines, Codes, Standards

Bill of RightsDonor Bill of Rights  - To ensure that philanthropy merits the respect and trust of the general public, AFP and other fundraising organizations declare that all donors have the following rights.

Code of Ethical Principles and Standards - The foundation of philanthropy is ethical fundraising, and a key mission of AFP is to advance and foster the highest ethical standards through its Code of Ethical Principles and Standards.

The Accountable Nonprofit Organization - "The Accountable Nonprofit Organization" is a statement of principles. It outlines the operations and procedures a charity undertakes to show it is accountable to donors, the people it serves, and the general public.

Ethics Enforcement: Handling and Preventing Unethical Behavior  - The stature of any self-regulated profession depends on how successfully it enforces ethical standards. Professional codes embody not just codifications of right and wrong but also the calling's ideals, aspirations, and sense of trusteeship for society. AFP's Code of Ethical Principles and Standards of Professional Practice, which includes detailed enforcement procedures, clearly expresses the association's vision of philanthropy promoted through responsible fundraising.

 

Frequently Asked Questions about AFP Ethics Standards Concerning Compensation

Q. What is the AFP Standard of Professional Practice regarding percentage compensation?

A. Standard No. 21 states: “Members shall not accept compensation or enter into a contract that is based on a percentage of contributions; nor shall members accept finder’s fees or contingent fees.” In this context, a finder's fee is defined as a fee paid for bringing a donor or a contribution to a not-for-profit organization.

Q. So what does Standard No. 21 mean?

A. It means that an AFP member or any other person or entity subscribing to the AFP Code of Ethical Principles may not accept any compensation that is based or conditioned upon a percentage of funds raised or generated for a not-for-profit organization.

For the purpose of this standard, “funds” are not only those defined by and subject to government regulations, or reported to the federal government as contributions, gifts, grants, or similar amounts received but also include sponsorship, advertising and similar revenues. For more information about percentage-based compensation, please see AFP’s position paper on the subject.

Q. What is the purpose of this standard?

A. There are three primary principles underlying this standard:

    1. Support for a nonprofit organization in any form is a voluntary action for the public benefit.
    2. The seeking or acceptance of charity revenues should not result in the personal benefit of any employees, contractor, or representatives of a charitable organization.
    3. Donor attitudes can be unalterably damaged in reaction to undue pressure and the awareness that a commission will be paid to a fundraiser from his or her gift, thus compromising the trust on which charity relies.

The purpose of this standard is to ensure that individuals or entities engaged in the fundraising sector are compensated for their experience, their expertise, the value of the product delivered, and the work they actually perform on behalf of the charitable organizations that employ their services, and not for work performed by others, funds obtained without meaningful effort by the AFP member, or funds obtained outside of the mission of their organization.

This standard recognizes that revenue generation by or for a nonprofit organization represents an ongoing endeavor through which current revenues received may be the result of efforts of others in previous years, and current activities may result in revenues which are received only in the future.

Finally, donor trust is of paramount importance. To earn and keep that trust, every aspect of charitable activity must be absolutely ethical and that includes the area of compensation. It is imperative that a compensation structure does not place self-gain over charitable mission and undermine donor trust.

Q. What are examples of unacceptable compensation?

A. Examples of unacceptable compensation practices include:

  • Accepting percentage-based compensation because an organization lacks sufficient budget, with the expectation that such will be converted to salary or fee when funds are available.
  • Disguising compensation as salary, fee or bonus when it is, in truth, a percentage of funds raised.
  • Accepting a compensation package in which a part is salary or fee and the balance is to be made up of a percentage of the funds to be raised.

 

 

Ten Star ChapterIDEA ChampionAFPNEO is committed to AFP’s principles of IDEA (Inclusion, Diversity, Equity and Access)
and strives to be resourceful to diverse individuals, groups, organizations and activities.

AFP Northeast Ohio Chapter | © 2015-2020 AFPNEO. All rights reserved.

Paula Mastroianni, President

PO Box 1286, Bath OH 44210 | 330-329-2472 | Fax 330-315-0399 | info@AFPNEO.org

 

 

Ten Star Chapter

 

Friends of Diversity Award

AFPNEO is committed to AFP’s principles of IDEA (Inclusion, Diversity, Equity and Access) and strives to be resourceful to diverse individuals, groups, organizations and activities.


AFP Northeast Ohio Chapter
© 2015-2020 AFPNEO.
All rights reserved.

Paula Mastroianni, President |
pmastroianni@starklibrary.org

PO Box 1286, Bath OH 44210
330-329-2472
Fax 330-315-0399
info@AFPNEO.org

 

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